Monthly Archives: July 2005

The Craziest Fix

The Craziest Fix

This morning, around 2:00 my BookCourier died. Not just dead batteries, cuz when I replaced them it wouldn’t respond. So after fooling with it for like an hour, I e-mailed tech support.

Then, this afternoon my MP3 player started acting up while I was doing the dishes. I had been listening to a podcast earlier in the day where a guy was describing this same problem. The hard drive just clicked and wouldn’t spin. I thought the fix he got off the Rio Karma message board was a little wacked out, but why not, I’ll try it anyway. Here it is.

  1. Grasp the Karma in your left hand with the screen facing you.
  2. While the unit is on, smack it against your right palm until your hand is red and sore.

As nuts as it sounds, it worked

I figured I’d probably end up breaking it, but not so much.

What happened was the head didn’t park itself properly when I turneed it off. Smacking the unit caused the head to slip back into the park position then the unit piced up like it should have.

Sheesh, that’s nuts. I hope Rio’s tech support never has to describe this procedure to people, because I’m guessing many of them would demand some sot of written assurance that this would not void their warrenty. I sure would have.

Washington, D.C.: Day Two

Washington, D.C.: Day Two

Today was day 1 of the conference.
We left our hotel for the conference hotel and registered. I’m glad to see they provided the agenda and other materials in accessible formats.
The conference was all right. Nothing too shocking or fantastic, but we’ll see.
One of the sessions was cancelled so we headed back to the hotel and rested for an hour.
After that we decided to do some sight-seeing and left for China Town.
China Town isn’t so much a town as it is a block and a half stretch of downtown Washington. We did find a nice little shop where my companions bought some souviniers and a good restaurant for dinner.
Tomorrow will bring more sessions, prep for Wednesday’s hill visits, and regional caucuses. I’ll bring the highlights of all 12 hours.

Washington D.C: Day One

Washington D.C: Day One

This morning I left for the NCIL conference in Washington D.C. NCIL is the National Council on Independent Living and seeing as I just took over the board of directors at the local Independent Living Center, I thought it would be a good idea to come check things out.
The flight was pretty uneventful. It was a CRJ and I was crammed in an isle seat with a rather large man, but all-in-all I survived.
Rather than spend the money on a cab from the airport to the hotel the 3 of us, myself and two of the center’s employees, opted for the D.C. MetroRail system. I’ve taken this before, but this was the first time for the two of them.
After we got to the station near the hotel we found that the exit we needed was closed on the weekends. Strange, but true. We spent about 20 minutes finding another exit and then the hotel. We made it, hot, but in one piece.
I unpacked, hooked up the computer and discovered to my horrer that internet access on my floor was dead. AHHHH!!!!
We went to dinner at a near by seafood place. I got a nice Filette steak and was impressed, despite the price.
That’s it for tonight’s activities. Tomorrow, the first day of the conference and initial thoughts of NCIL.

Kids vs. Adults, and Panic Moments

Kids vs. Adults, and Panic Moments

I’m standing in the line at the Wal-Mart pharmacy waiting to pick up some prescriptions for Tigress. This lady in front of me is holding her kid, and he’s acting cute like most little kids do. He’s talking to his Mom and all of the sudden starts asking if he has to take a nap when he gets home. He’s really not big on the whole nap thing. I’m thinking, “Kid, if I could go home and take a nap I’d be so happy.”

Shanti, is this common? Do kids just not like naps when we adults love them? In truth, is the whole napping concept really just for the parents anyway?
***
I had a little panic moment this afternoon when I couldn’t remember how long before the wedding I had to apply for the marriage license. Fortunately my friend who works for the county gave me the clerk’s office number (I was still at Wal-Mart when this thought occured to me) and I found out it only costs $20. All you need is photo ID, no blood test, and no waiting period. The 60 days thing was the limit before the license is invalid. Panic moment averted.
***
Next panic moment involves a bill from the hospital, and an insurance problem.
Fortunately, I was able to clear that one up quickly too. I love computers. When the hospital can log into the insurance company’s system and realize the problem is with them, and has since been fixed, it’s great. Especially since we no longer owe them $990. Like we’ve got it anyway. Sheesh.

Eight to Ten Weeeeks!!!

Eight to Ten Weeeeks!!!

That’s right. It will take 8 to 10 weeks to get the Braille knob for the new washing machine. Aparently they custom make them. In Ant Arctica. With frost bitten fingers. In a snows storm. They even make the plastic from scratch too.
At least that’s the only explanation I can come up with for why it will take that long to get a knob.
Cripes!
Normally, I would have just applied Braille labels and used puff paint to mark the pointer on the knob. Except, this washer is different. While the knobs for temperature and load size are the easy kind to mark, having just one piece to them, the timer knob is different.
See, instead of being one knob, where part of the knob points to the cycle, this one has 3 pieces. A pointer and the label underneath, a clear plastic piece covering the label and pointer, and the outer knob that gets pushed in and turned to set the pointer. All 3 pieces turn independently. So when you push the knob in, set the load, and pull the knob out to start the washer the outer knob does not turn to follow the pointer. There is no way to line it back up again.
I thought I’d merely pull the knob off, remove the plastic cover, and mark the pointer, but I can’t figure out how. Whirlpool is sending us the replacement knob, which I guess means I’ll have to get the old one off somehow anyway, but that’s not for another 8 to 10 weeks.
In the mean time, either we figure out a temporary solution, or start handing out nose plugs to those around us.